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Distillery town – A waltz into the Victorian era

Distillery town – A waltz into the Victorian era

In south of downtown Toronto (Canada), is one of the most popular and blessedly beautiful tourist spots of the country. Welcome to distillery town, home to some of the world’s largest distilleries and breweries. So what is there to do around a shanty distillery factory? Here at the D-town there are things to do, even more things to look at and a whole town to explore. A visit to this engaging tourist center situated outside of Toronto demands that you best put away 3 hours, to take in everything it has to offer.

After being founded in 1832, Distillery town began as a modest space which grew into the largest distillery in the world by the year 1860. Its no wonder that it was voted as a National historic site in the year 1988. Almost immediately, renovation plans began in full swing to give this 13 acre piece of history a thorough face-lift and make it more open and accessible to people.


Chiseled out of red bricks and tin chimneys, the town has a hauntingly distinct presence. It is reminiscent of a quiet alley in Manchester or a narrow street in Dublin. Sometime in 1990 the town was swept up by a spirit for redesigning and refurbishing. The authorities wished to endeavor preservation of the Victorian era industrial designs that Distillery town housed. It was perhaps the only site of the like in all of North America. Over the many years of its existence many of the working units were shut down only to have been converted into the many attractions you can find there today.

There are art galleries, bars and boutiques filling in the empty spaces and tucked into almost every side of the streets. These galleries sport huge canvasses on the brick walls giving it a thoroughly rustic touch. To compliment the cultural stronghold is the gastronomical aspect. Its numerous restaurants and cafes provide some of the most extensive menus in all of the country. The post renovation condition was so impressive, it drew in so many tourists that year. Following this, Distillery town has grown to its current size – a charming little wayward town with bustling people walking on indiscreet streets. On a lucky day, you might also find the occasional musician wandering about on the cobblestone streets filling the evening air with a tune.


The ideal tour around the town is best done during spring, summer or fall when dining al fresco is comfortable. Each of the buildings are lovingly restored to its original glory. The wide, open spaces, high ceilings that are roomy and accommodate many people offer the candor the modest town has thrived by. But not all distilleries are shut down now, then the name wouldn’t befit it now, would it?


Thankfully, many distilleries like the Mill street brewery and the El Catrin brewery still function around town offering platters of artisan beers and eclectic varieties of food. Some of them even give tours of the proceedings in a distillery. So if you would like to know how your favorite brew of beer has been made, feel free to ask for a tour. Canada is especially a friendly country, and these small towns consistently uphold that faith. The town although small by stature has given way for almost 800 television shows and movie shooting events, owing to its unique industrial designs and attractive town scape. The town also has some impressive movie screenings playing select choices of artistic films of the years and some commercial ones as well.

If you’re one for wandering and getting lost in a different place, then travelling by feet is the idea way to capture the true heart and soul of the town. Sculptures adorn walkways and even parking areas, piquing attention and much awe. If you scout around town, you can spot three of them in the Distillery town itself.


Don’t forget to holler at Trinity Street, the most important center of the town is perhaps the hub of all things attractive with bustling, colorful markets facilitating as something of a public square. If you happen to be strolling here on a bright summer’s evening, you could just witness some of the open stadium concerts that are famously celebrated here.

So come here and get lost in the middle of a song, or a painting and find yourself with a book in a coffee shop. Stare at the artistry and prepared to be enamored at the multitude of things that are locked away into the quiet folds of a truly beautiful country.

So, come on and climb on to the Patio with a fine brew in hand and enjoy the view of the world from here!

About amrutha varshini

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